Building Our Personal Cost-Benefit Analysis

We do cost-benefit analysis in every day life, salve from comparative shopping to deciding if it’s worth the risk to try bungee jumping. When we evaluate the cost of something compared to the benefit we’ll receive, treatment we make the decision based on what’s important to us as individuls. There’s no “universal standard of worth”. Even currency — which we often think of as being pretty immutable — is subject to fluctuations in value.

The cost-benefit analysis of gaming is at the core of an ongoing debate over how games are made and marketed, site and how they’re designed to make money for the developers, and take money from the consumers.

A Brief History of Monitization

I’ve been through all modern phases of video game monitization. Here’s a quick timeline as I remember it (which may or may not be entirely accurate):

  1. Games are self contained and sold for a “box cost”. This was during the early days of the Atari 2600, NES, Sega Genesis, and even PC games.
  2. When the Internet arrives, we get BBS and online provider games through services like AOL and CompuServe, but which require a per-minute fee to play (on top of the money we spent to access the service provider).
  3. As PC gaming continues to rise in prominence, modern MMOs arrives. Now, we pay for the connection, then a box price, and a monthly fee. On paper, this seems suicidal, but thanks to the popularity of World of Warcraft, people warm to it, and the genre explodes over the next 15 years.
  4. Smartphones and tablets arrive, bringing a whole new and untapped frontier of gaming that needs rules to be written. Publishers experiment with different price points to see what the market would bear. With such an open field, devs that traditionally published for console or PC flock to mobile to stake their claim before the money dries up.
  5. Existing subscription games and new online games start to offer non-subscription options. Games add cash shops which allow players to spend in small increments for various services, convienience, and content. Having it’s pedigree in the East, where the model forced players to spend in order to advance and compete, this free to play model gets a bad rap in achivement-oriented Western culture, and is quickly associated with “pay to win”. Meanwhile, mobile gaming has followed suit, offering games for free with cash shops that offer “shortcuts” for players.

We pick up the thread at this point.

A Tale Of Two Cities (Or Rather, Gamers)

There’s two distinct camps in this scene. The first is the “traditional” gamer. The second is the “nouveau gamer”. Sometimes the lines blur, but more often than not, the traditional gamer busies himself with both camps, while the nouveau gamer might not even know the other camp exists.

Traditional gamers are used to at least items 3-5 above. Older gamers can stretch back beyond item 1. Regardless, at some point during the formative period of the traditional gamer’s gaming identity, he found a monitization scheme that worked for him, and he stuck by it. I think that for most gamers, this is item #3 or #1.

MMOs are unique in that — in theory — they never end. The world continues to run when we’re not logged in, and we can (ideally) look forward to expansions that make the game bigger. We also get patches and updates, game play balances, and if we’re lucky, some free content here and there.

They’re also unique in that for the past 15 years, MMOs came with an ongoing subscription, a practice that became the norm. Because of the wild success of WoW, anyone who wanted to make an MMO had to support it by charging that monthly fee, and the company that could reproduce WoW’s special sauce could potentially rake in millions of dollars per month. We as consumers learned to accept this, because we felt that the benefits of the cost were worthwhile. MMOs with subscriptions were “buffets” of content: we had access to everything the game had to offer, with no artificial restrictions or additional payments.

Gamers must have felt that this was a good deal, because the subscription MMO market exploded after WoW. The explosion was both a desire of publishers to have a cash cow, and consumer’s acceptance of paying a monthly fee.

Non-traditional gamers don’t view things in that light. They came into the picture around item #4, and ONLY for item #4. They don’t have the baggage that traditional gamers do. They don’t play a wide spectrum of games, don’t play often, and aren’t used to spending tons of money up front for a game. They don’t see anything wrong with paying $5 for the convenience of playing at certain choke-points, which is how Candy Crush Saga earns millions of dollars.

The Cost-Benefit Ratio

If there’s any universal constant, then it’s that people like to get the most bang for their buck. That includes getting everything for nothing, but in lieu of that, it means getting as much as possible for as little as possible. We all have thresholds of how much we’re willing to pay based on what we expect to get from it. Like so many things, however, we don’t necessarily know what we want or where that threshold is, but once we experience it, we recognize it, and once we recognize it, we rarely see any reason to keep looking for anything better.

On the other hand, no one likes to feel like they’re being fleeced, or that they’re being treated like a commodity to be nickled and dimed. It’s harder to see value in an overall product when the transactions are spread over time and for different aspects of the bigger picture. This is both a blessing (for publishers) and a curse (for consumers) because the statistics favor the payee over the payer.

For the traditional gamer, and depending on the individual’s genre of choice, the cost-benefit ratio of payment to payout is going to hit a ceiling at some point, and from there it will not budge. Some gamers won’t go beyond pay once, play forever. Others feel that $15 buffet model is tilted in their favor. Still others feel that getting something for nothing is better than getting anything for a fee, and the final group has no issues paying a la carte.

But each level there often seems to be many gamers who are violently reactive to the level above it. Box-cost only fans can’t fathom why anyone would pay a subscription. Subscribers can’t abide by the cash shop model. Many free to play fans won’t go near the cash shop. Only the full-service free to play user has no one to rail against in this space…except games targeted outside of their own demographic.

Many traditional gamers — no matter what monitization tier they occupy in their own space — find the practices being employed in the mobile space to be abhorrent. Brian Green (who worked on Meridian 59, and who therefor knows about this kind of thing) posted a link to an interview with former Free Realms developer Laralyn McWilliams on the current “best practices” in free-to-play game design. Part of the gist of it is that the way the market is now, there’s no room for trial and error, so when a game likeCandy Crush Saga makes millions of dollars by allowing players to spend their way out of a jam, other companies will adopt it, and it becomes the new de facto “best practice”.

Po-tay-toes and Po-tah-toes

Traditional gamers can’t see the benefit to the cost that these “best practices” are espousing because for the most part, they’re used to having their game at their fingertips. Games are meant to be played, and the more game you play without restriction, the better. Just as buffet fans might consider the F2P model to be exploitative, the idea that a company would purposefully design their product to frustrate a player to the point where their progress is held hostage unless they pay money to progress is an affront to what gaming is all about.

One of the best examples is EA’s recent mobile version of Dungeon Keeper. The original PC game allowed you to create and defend a dungeon. This new version follows the same idea, but as you’re building your dungeon, you’re forced to wait HOURS for a single task to complete. Impatient players can spend real money to hurry this along, ensuring a continuous game play experience, but therein lies the problem from the traditional gamer point of view (especially those who honestly remember the original Dungeon Keeper). Why did EA make this bastardized version of such a well regarded IP instead of making another entry in the traditional vein? The cost of paying to skip the four hour build time isn’t worth the benefit. Normally this might be up for debate, depending on the point of view of the person involved, but we have prescident in how the Dungeon Keeper franchise should be played, and it’s NOT having to pay to skip a four hour queue.

Still, some folks are OK with this. They’ve got no baggage the way traditional gamers do. Mobile games are so transient that many strictly mobile gamers think it’s a plus that the games are free. With so many no-cost games, it’s perfectly OK to pay a little here, a little there, now and then. Maybe the “why” is lost on them, but I’m of the mind that it’s not; it just doesn’t matter as much to them as the idea does to traditional gamers. Their threshold for cost to benefit isn’t just higher than that of the traditional gamer, it’s in a totally different league.

In Closing

Everything that we do has a cost-benefit analysis attached to it, and the hierarchy of fees associated with gaming marks different thresholds for different people. But gamers are very covetous of their hobby, including it’s trademarks and use of said trademarks. Many traditional gamers would barely acknowledge most mobile products as “games”, but in the face of business practices that are designed to exploit a person’s willingness to spend their way out of a jam, these gamers will seek to distance themselves and their own aspect of the industry from association with mobile gaming where these are considered to be the “best practices”.

These views are codified based on the cost-benefit ratio that each individual has accepted as his or her personal ceiling. The benefit is how much game they get for the cost, with some preferring to pay for the buffet, and some who are willing to play for free and to spend on content a la carte.

What worries many traditional gamers, however, is the incessant harping that mobile and tablet gaming is the future of the hobby. We’ve heard about how the gaming industry has seen declining revenue over the past few years, with at least part of the blame resting on the notion that more people are gaming on mobile and tablets, and less on console and PCs. For those who count gaming as their primary hobby, being told that their “future” is this platform which values visibility, metrics, and sales over “by gamers, for gamers” is a frightening and infuriating prospect. Traditional gamers have already started hating on mobile gaming when “their” developers ran to capitalize on the empty playground of mobile platforms and put their future PC and console plans into question, but seeing how companies have adopted “best practices” that amount of holding a game hostage is sending many gamers into fits of rage.

Twitter – A Rant

My “official” foray into social media began with Twitter. I don’t count my early blogging days because that was back before these push-button blogs existed, dosage and the only way we had to really advertise was through web-rings. There really weren’t enough people writing or looking at blogs back then to consider them “social”, cheapest or even a network.

I met a lot of outstanding folks through Twitter back then, and the platform used to serve me well, until the lot of us realized that our interactions were hampered by the 140 character limit. We were beyond merely “interacting” and had crossed well into the realm of “discussion” on a regular basis, so we moved first to Google Buzz, and then Google Plus.

I’ve maintained my Twitter account for a few reasons. First and foremost, it’s fast. A lot of information comes to me through Twitter, and often times before I can find anything on any news website (makes verification difficult, but that’s the Internet for you!). Secondly, official accounts, when used correctly, can provide a wealth of information and customer service.

Recently, however, I’ve felt that Twitter is a crowd. Not a party, or a gathering, or a mob, but a crowd. Well behaved, for the most part, but when you stand in a crowd in the real world you’re in the middle of a bunch of cells, the majority of which have nothing to do with you, which don’t interact with you, and which you have no reason to interact with. Watching my Twitter stream flow by, I feel that I’m in the middle of other people’s conversations, and that’s not very useful to me. Twitter has taught me that it’s OK to inject oneself into an ongoing Twitter conversation, but not all conversations are worth jumping into. It seems that most of the conversations I see on Twitter these days are like this. Some are worse; some are just circle-jerks in which people will re-Tweet any Tweet in which they’re mentioned, or will insist on including the same people by name in their Tweets, creating a self-sustaining in-joke. Ideally, Twitter is meant to be open; a broadcast platform first, a direct address second, yet some folks use it like an old-fashioned party line in which they ignore the fact that there are actually other people outside of their little sewing circle.

One of my pet peeves is that Twitter is only useful when it actually conveys information. Some people, for one reason or another, are purposefully ambiguous, or are merely forgetful when passing along news. Vague allusions to potentially interesting or important news stories without a link to a source is the absolute worst transgression of this type: “I’ve got something to say about something, but I won’t provide you with the foundation that makes my point actually meaningful.” Sure, Twitter can field a lot of repeat information, but assuming that everyone who follows you already knows is just dumb; as fast as information moves, it doesn’t always move at the same speed in every direction.

Why don’t I quit the platform, then? I probably will, at least of any humans. It’s ironic that I feel that I get more benefit from following companies and brands than I do individuals. Like I said, any conversation of worth happens on G+, and if anything, Twitter is becoming more and more pithy, like Facebook and it’s user’s “begging for attention” posts.

Holiday Traditions and Traditional Holidays

I enjoyed Pyschochild’s post about “The Meaning Of Holidays”, link earlier this week. Holidays are kind of weird to me; although there are observable holidays throughout the year which both require and don’t require a “buy in” (Easter: yes; Arbor Day: no), malady I don’t really get into a “holiday mode” quite like I do when Fall rolls around. It’s the time of year where a lot of big holidays drive bumper-to-bumper, view and if you fit certain configurations, you never really stop observing from October to the start of January.

At the risk of too much navel-gazing, I want to know the why behind this seasonal switch. Holidays are at least days on the calendar, and many people simply observe them as such. I can’t imagine what it’s like for those who truly don’t celebrate any of the year’s end holidays here in the West, since we’re practically drowning in trappings absolutely everywhere; I suppose if one wanted to be cynical, it would be easy to justify a “bah, humbug” on the whole thing. But as someone who isn’t like that, the immersion of the Holidays (with a capital “H”) is part of the allure.

A Brief History of The Past

Let’s be frank: when we say “Holidays”, we’re including Halloween and Thanksgiving (here in the West) as a courtesy. We’re really focused on Christmas and Hanukkah. For the purpose of this monologue, though, I’m talking about Christmas (apologies to my Jewish reader), since it’s the one I celebrate.

Christmas is a good holiday because despite the attempts of those to nail it down to one thing and one thing only, it’s many thing to many people. For some, it’s one of the Ultra Religious holidays. For others, it’s about togetherness that doesn’t need a religious reason. It’s one holiday where everyone is right, and no one is wrong; we get out of it what we want to get out of it, and really that’s kind of the point. No matter how the holiday started,  Christmas is always a “modern holiday”.

Or is it? I read somewhere recently a criticism of how we’re observing Christmas. Specifically, the author stated that we’re not observing a “modern holiday”, we’re observing a “Baby Boomer’s holiday” by allowing the celebrations of the early 20th century to color how we celebrate today. On one hand, I guess he/she is correct, because I instantly understood what he/she meant. On the other hand, I think it’s a short-sighted claim.

Ghosts of Christmas Past

In my view, a lot of what we consider in a non-religious, “traditional” Christmas comes from, or is about, life between 1940-something to 1950-something. The Big Christmas Movies like It’s a Wonderful Life and White Christmas were made in those eras. A lot of the holiday “comfort music” we  have is sung by Bing Crosby and Frank Sinatra, also big during those eras. Even one of the more popular modern holiday films — A Christmas Story — takes place in the 50’s.

Ghosts of Christmas Present

I’m not a fan of “newer” holiday stuff. I think the last decent holiday movie to be made was probably National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation, or maybe Scrooged (in the 80’s). I can tolerate Michael Buble, but I want to club Mariah Carey with a 30 pound candy cane. And no good “new” Christmas music as been written. Adult Christmas Wish can suck it. Hard.

Whys and Wherefores

I’m only 40 years old. I wasn’t alive when the “classic” vision of Christmas season was actually the present, and yet I dislike anything that was created for the holiday in the past 30 or so years (generally).

I figure it this way.

We have an unabashed “feel good” vibe in the elder Christmas fare, thanks to World War II. After so much wartime horror, the first Christmas back home must have been the most wonderful thing ever: reuniting with family and friends that no one thought would be seen again. Remembering those who were lost. Being thankful that those who returned from the war returned alive. It was probably amazingly optimistic at that point, and if you’re not concerned with the religious angle, it’s about as close to the “meaning of the season” as you can get: Enjoy, and be thankful for the people around you.

In modern times…well, it sounds like a broken record, but we’ve both lost that honest, traditional feeling while fetishizing it at the same time. Almost every ad or commercial in print or on TV this time of year features imagery of “traditional style” holidays with families eating a festive dinner, or of welcoming friends and family into the home. It doesn’t take a cynic to understand that these ads are attempting to bridge the traditional sense of family and togetherness with how good it is to buy stuff. Outside of commercials, though, we’re also narrowly focused on bitching about the shopping season creep, or whether or not it’s appropriate for municipal grounds to sport a manger.  When it’s generally understood that every shopping outlet is a death-sport arena on Black Friday, is it really a wonder we look back to the days when people enjoyed the holiday in a more honest fashion?

That’s not to say that we here in 2013 can’t enjoy the holiday in an honest fashion; it’s just that I don’t believe that our honest feelings about it are rooted in our own lifetimes. No doubt we have fond memories of Christmas as kids, but as an adult, I really find that modern approaches are lacking in anything worth incorporating into my seasonal outlook. New Christmas songs aren’t about the holiday or the season like White Christmas or Jingle Bells. They’re about interpersonal relationships, and ham-handed attempts to shame us into remembering our humanity. None of them really address The Holiday itself; they’re all as narcissistic as any new song is any other day of the year. Same with new holiday movies (most of which are made for TV by those middle-of-the-road networks like Hallmark or ABC Family).

I may not have grown up in the 40’s and 50’s, but my parents did. Their Christmas was the “traditional” Christmas we’re talking about here, and so it became my traditional Christmas through them. It’s where I feel comfortable, so naturally it’s becoming my daughter’s traditional Christmas, through me. In a way, we are living the “Baby Boomer” vision of the holiday, but it’s partly out of nurture, and not because we view it as intrinsically superior (although in light of my low opinion of modern output for the season, I offer that as a vague generality and not a personal affectation). I have no problem with it; it’s still my holiday as much as anyone else’s. No one owns it, and although I don’t have the same reasons or the same intense source as folks did in the 40’s and 50’s, the feelings are a lot stronger, and a lot more comforting, than what I feel I can get from a more “modern” interpretation.

How long will this go on? How many more generations will Bing Crosby last as a cornerstone of Christmas? Maybe not forever, which is why I think the unnamed author who accused us of “celebrating someone else’s holiday” isn’t seeing the forest for the trees. We’re not so far away from the Christmas of our ancestors that we can begin to take comfort in images of adults fist-fighting over the last toy in Wal-Mart as the “true meaning of Christmas”. Many of us grew up with those who experienced the Boomer’s Christmas first hand, and like any generational shift, moving away from that will probably happen gradually as each subsequent generation takes parts of what came before it, and what it creates on it’s own, until the oldest parts of tradition have been marginalized to the atomic level. At some point, I would expect that people will prefer The Santa Claus over Miracle on 34th Street, but I really hope I’m dead by that time, because I don’t think I’d want to be around when that happens.

Then And Now: A Social Retrospective For Dummies

There was this guy, link Adam Orth, ask who was a creative director at Microsoft, viagra sale and who stirred up a lot of ire by mincing no words when discussing people’s irritation at the Xbox One being “always on, always connected”. As the Internet is wont to do, people took it personally, and worked quickly to make Orth’s life a living hell (according to him).

I could really care less if some random internet dude tells me to “deal with it” in hash tag form. Yes, I pictured this guy as Any Guy, saying this out loud with a “meh” expression and a shrug of the shoulders like a total douchebag, but let’s face it: my opinion is always going to be valid as far as I’m concerned, and that this one guy who’s on the other side of the country, whom I have never met, thinks otherwise makes absolutely no difference in my life. That’s not an attempt to convince myself when my feelings are hurt; I had totally forgotten this guy about 10 minutes after I had originally heard about him.

But his re-surfacing got me thinking, as old people do, about Days Gone By (in this case, pre-Internet). I lived during that time, so this isn’t some half-assed co-opt of an “up hill, both ways” story. Back then, our socializing was limited to only those within arms reach, either through school, clubs, sports, religious institutions, family, or neighbors. The World was a map, or what we heard on TV news or read in the newspapers. Most people (in the U.S., and especially where I grew up) didn’t know anyone on the other side of the world; it might as well have been the 1300’s, before people were really sailing all over the place and meeting new people. The most international I ever got was when my cousins hosted an exchange student from Spain.

Back in those days, you had two choices when dealing with other people. You could totally bullshit people by acting and behaving in a manner that represented who you wanted to be, or you could act like yourself. Usually people chose the first option if they thought their real selves wouldn’t be accepted. But that could really drain your batteries that way, because you had to be “on” 24/7. Remember, your interactions were spatially limited, so if you dropped your guard and someone found out that you were a racist and not a choir-boy, for example, news got around fast. Your entire reputation went from “clean cut” to “bigoted liar” in only a few hours. And you couldn’t get away unless you moved.

Here in modern times, people take for granted the fact that on the Internet, nationality or location in the world is almost meaningless. You can interact with people anywhere, any time, and I think we’ve quickly become immune to the “gee whiz” of it all, especially those who grow up in this environment and know no different.

But as the Orth Parable teaches us, we no longer have the option to choose between throwing up a facade or being ourselves. The freedom that the Internet provides for our benefit is the same freedom that allows people to gang up on one another, to find and publish someone’s home address, the names of family members, the location of children’s schools, a person’s religious and political affiliations, and all kinds of information that isn’t horrible by itself, but in the wrong (and determined) hands, could ignite some Really Bad Shit.

Orth chose to show his true self. He spoke his mind, based on his beliefs that the things people were upset about weren’t worth getting upset about, and that people weren’t seeing the forest for the trees, and were overreacting because of it. But he shot from the hip, and without the benefit of body language or vocal inflection, his comments came off as condescending and arrogant. He wasn’t talking to anyone specifically; he was addressing a nebulous “They”, which included anyone who felt that his comments were addressed directly at them. The Internet being what it is took this slight and stretched it, magnified it, blew it out of proportion, and passed it around until people did what anonymous people will do: they made it as personal for Orth as they felt he had made it for them.

Orth was an idiot. For any intelligent person spending 10 minutes or less on the Internet, it’s pretty obvious that if you’re going to be yourself, you had better be ready for the repercussions. Know this: there are people who are ready for that battle. The rest of us should know that if want to really enjoy our time on the Internet, we have to be who we want to be, not who we are.

Let’s face it: everyone does and says stupid things, and everyone had opinions that other people would find unappealing. There’s no denying that. Back When, if you said something stupid, it would only be stupid if the people in your immediate area thought it was stupid. In the Internet Age, you can say even the most innocuous thing, but it’ll have a world-wide reach in a matter of seconds, and it’ll linger for weeks, months, or years. Someone, somewhere, will find what you said and will call you and idiot for having said it. So we have two options: stay off the Internet, or present a deliberate and cultivated persona designed to provide a little ambiguity as possible regarding your intent, your stance, and your future interaction with people.

Orth had a job to do, and he blew it. He chose to be himself when he should have been Xbox One’s Creative Director. I could write another screed about the disdain that corporations have for consumers as a way to explain how Orth actually was speaking as a Creative Director, but I think this was a case of one man acting alone. His follow-up interview shows that he’s no less clueless about how the Internet works now than he was when he was working for Microsoft. He doesn’t seem to understand that he was just as much to blame by not realizing what kind of a potential shit-storm his off-handed remarks could start. He continues to be dismissive of the people he should have once worked very, very hard to court, even after this debacle caused him apparent hardship. Had he been a model Creative Director, he would have worked hard — probably to no avail — to sell people on the status quo, not tell them to basically fuck off and suck it up. 

That someone who is allowed to speak in public on behalf of another (or a company or brand) can be so clueless about how to comport oneself on the Internet is mind-blowing to me. This kind of behavior would have gone totally unchallenged 25 years ago, but the reality of it is that we can’t just assume that people know us, understand us, or that our words won’t have repercussions somewhere in the world, and then feign indignation when the backlash hits us.

Using Multiple Locations with #Twitch

[I’ve dredged this up from the Way Back Machine, see because it’s still relevant and potentially useful]

In the same day in which I lamented the lack of multi-input to Twitch from remote locations, I did some digging and found that yes, it is entirely possible to have broadcasters from remote locations stream to one Twitch channel. However, there’s a massive asterisk there. Twitch itself doesn’t allow re-broadcasting, so it’s basically one stream in from your broadcaster, one stream out through their player. You can fake it if you set up multiple viewers through Twitchify or Multitwitch, and isolate each player in its own layer through OBS, XSplit, FFSplit, or other broadcast software, but you’re probably going to suffer from re-broadcasting a broadcast.

If you want to truly aggregate streams, you need an RTMP server. Here’s an example of how that works:

Steve, Kelly, and Mittens are all playing MechWarrior Online with other members of their clan, and want to create a slick recruitment video. Using their broadcaster-of-choice, they all stream to a custom RTMP server using the url rtmp://server.address.com/[personal-channel]/[personal-key] instead of the predefined setup that allows them to stream directly to Twitch.

The RTMP server handles the input and makes it available to the public at the same address each broadcaster uses for input.

Another clan member — The Producer — isn’t playing. Instead, he’s got two apps running: a web browser which has multiple video viewers that display the RTMP streams on one page, à la Twichify, and a copy of XSplit. Unlike the broadcasters, The Producer needs to use XSplit because it’s the only broadcaster that can use RTMP streams as input (get on that, OBS and FFSplit!). Each RTMP stream behaves just like any other input within XSplit, allowing the producer to move and resize windows, aggregate them onto one canvas, or give them their own full-screen canvas. Each input displays what the individual streamers are streaming, so if Mittens has a webcam overlay on her game input, it’s what The Producer will see, and will have no control over moving multiple input sources from the broadcaster.

Finally, The Producer uses the normal Broadcast to Twitch settings to pump the aggregated stream to the public.

Why?

This allows for streamers to get groups of people together into one broadcast, something that Twitch doesn’t support. With a producer at the helm, a group of people can make some pretty slick, live, near professional quality video without the need for post-processing. If one stream were a webcam focusing on some commentators who are watching the RTMP streams themselves, you could set up a League of Legends style eSports presentation. Also, by having one aggregate display, and then each stream on their own canvases, a group can create a pretty decent show, live and without post-processing.

Also, if you have an embeded video player which can accept RTMP streams, you could put your own video player on your own website using Flowplayer or JWPlayer, and skip the Twitch ads! It’s entirely possible to have broadcasters input to the RTMP server, have a producer aggregate those streams, and then re-post to the RTMP server. If your embded video player picks up on any of those streams, it can be posted to your own website.

Caveats

First, you need the RTMP server. I did some leg-work, and found two commercial servers, and one free server. You need hosting, virtual or otherwise, or a box in your own home.

Obviously, to make this work, you need someone to act as the producer who will aggregate all the streams and send it out to the public. Sadly, it can’t be one of the streamers, unless someone wants to run two broadcasters: one to send out, and one to aggregate and publish. While possible, that person would need a pretty hefty PC, a lot of bandwidth, and insane multitasking abilities.

Also, you have to use stand-alone broadcasting software. Games which pump out the streams directly to Twitch won’t work, which also excludes the next generation of consoles (unless you do something like this).

Technical Junk

There are some commercial options available, like Wowza or Red 5, if you have dedication and money to burn. You’ll also need a physical server on which to run them.

I set up a virtual Ubuntu server on Microsoft’s Azure cloud computing system and followed a set of instructions I found on the OBS forums for setting up the free and lightweight nginx web server with an RTMP plugin. I’m not a Linux guy, so I had to kick my way through the installation, but once I understood what I was doing wrong, everything went off without a hitch (which never happens for me when dealing with Linux!).

If you want to have multiple inputs, each input will need it’s own endpoint. When using Twitch, this is the channel name: http://www.twitch.tv/CHANNEL_NAME. The OBS forum instructions explain how to set this up in the nginx.conf file (the config section labeled “live”), so if you have a team, name each endpoint by the streamer’s nickname and you should be all set.

Twitch has a layer of security in it’s broadcast key, but nginx isn’t so secure. You will need to provide a suffix to your RTMP url (http://www.myrtmp.com/CHANNEL_NAME/BROADCAST_KEY), but that broadcast key can be anything you want. The only thing to keep in mind is that the whole URL needs to be provided to whatever input catcher is being used. So when using XSplit or VNC to pick up the stream, you’ll need to include the URL, channel name, and whatever arbitrary broadcast key you decide to stream to. Change it, and the stream catcher will need to update it’s input URL. As if that wasn’t enough, some stream catchers may or may not need that broadcast key bit. Yeah, sorry about that. I know VNC (for monitoring the stream) does need it. XSplit may or may not. FlowPlayer may or may not. I have to run a few more tests to determine which ones need which data.

One of the benefits from this is that you can use this set up to also record streams to disk (on the server) or even to send the stream direct to Twitch from the RTMP server. This is basically replicating the functionality that the broadcast software offers out of the box, but it’s possible that there might be a situation out there that doesn’t offer a direct pipe to a broadcasting outlet, and putting an RTMP server in between might solve that issue.

Microsoft Surface Pro

As some folks know (probably the same 8 people who have read this blog), purchase I picked up a Microsoft Surface Pro (128GB) yesterday. After my Nexus shattered (it would cost as much to buy a new one as it would to have Asus repair it), try I was tablet-less, buy information pills adrift in a sea of potential situations where my phone is out of reach, and when I knew something was happening somewhere…but what?

Joking aside, here’s a run-down.

What’s in the Box?

I didn’t take pictures, but there’s a power cable in two parts (power connector is proprietary, which blows), the tablet, the stylus, and a manual.

Physical Presence

The Surface is pretty hefty. I haven’t weighed it, but I’d say it’s about as hefty as Game of Thrones in hardcover. It’s also not svelt. I’d say it’s more akin to the first generation iPad than the current generation iPad. I realize that there’s a contingent out there for whom this will be a problem, but we’ll get to that.

The “VaporMg” case is…OK? I guess? The built-in kickstand is great, but it doesn’t make that cool sucking-sound that it did on stage in presentations. I was kind of disappointed by that. Normally, these devices aren’t very “user-maintenance friendly”, but I think this one takes the cake. Along the edge there’s a series of vents that allow the innards to expel heat, which isn’t something you think about a lot on a tablet, but we’ll get to that also.

There are a few ports and buttons around the edge. The top has a power button and a mic. The right side has headphones, volume rocker, and USB port. The left side has a MicroSD slot, power connector, and a port for external video connections. The power port is elongated, and has a series of magnetic connectors. The power doesn’t snap in physically; it’s just magnetically held there, but it’s a powerful hold. When not charging, the stylus’s rocker buttons (if you know Wacom stylus design) serve as a magnetic male to the female port. I wouldn’t trust the stylus to remain connected during a vigorous trip in a backpack, but it sure beats having the stylus loose on a messy desk. The bottom is given over to the keyboard connector. Again, another really powerful magnet keeps it in place. This time, it DOES make that satisfying sound when connected.

Turn It On

If you’ve used Windows 8 on a desktop system, then there is no difference in presentation between what you get here and what you get on the desk. Except you can smear fingerprints on this screen and have something to show for it. I showed it to a co-worker, and he made one swipe of the Modern UI before professing that he could already see that Windows 8 really does best on a touch device. Beyond that, I won’t review Windows 8. Short answer: I’ve used it with real effort, and I like it.

The screen is pretty bright. The glass was ultra-shiny when I unboxed it, and I debated whether or not to touch it (hint: I did) and foul the fine finish with my human-grease. The sound was just OK; Better than what you’d get out of most tablets, I think, but it’s not very loud. I watched a video last night, and I had to crank the both the Windows and the player’s volumes up to max to hear it. It does have Bluetooth, so I can connect my headset to it.

The resolution is 1900 X 1280, which is what is “standard” for PC’s these days. But I installed a game (Prison Architect) and it couldn’t handle the screen. I was unable to get it to fit properly. But I switched to a 1900×1280 wallpaper, and it fit perfectly.

Performance

It’s fast. There was a lot of talk about Surface RT being sluggish and all that, but I can’t speak to that. Swiping on the Pro is instant and gratifying. Sometimes a bit too instant. I’ve occasionally had to chase tiles around as the screen moved under my timid finger. Be direct. Be forceful. Stab that icon like you mean it!

The big sell for me was the stylus (no matter what St. Jobs claims). I’ve always wanted to get rid of paper: it’s transient, and uncategorizable without additional filing systems. Electronic note taking is great, but adding the layer of handwritten notes and drawings, and it’s basically all you could ask for. I still mourn the  assassination of the Courier (moment of silence…), but so far, the stylus is awesome. The digitizer was designed by Wacom, so it’s got pedigree, and while there’s still a delay between stroke and cursor, the fine tip of the stylus puts those marshmallow stylus poseurs on other tablets to shame. I can take a page of notes in OneNote, sync it to my SkyDrive, and review it on my PC. It’s my organizational Nirvana.

GAMES!

I actually haven’t gotten this far, would you believe? I did install Steam (Suck it, Newell!), though. As mentioned above, I tried Prison Architect with disastrous results, but it’s an indie game in alpha, so I didn’t expect much. This morning, I installed Civilization V because I was reminded that it had touch-screen controls. I fired it up and (after downloading the .NET framework) it had an option to run win Windows 8 mode with touch controls. The game seemed to run well; I was at work, and didn’t get to really PLAY the game, but I’ll check in with it later.

Aside from that, there’s whatever is on the Marketplace, which is to say “almost nothing”. But I have hope: Unity just released update 4.2 the other day, which has FREE support for porting to Windows 8 devices. Assuming it’s not too much work, I hope developers will flip that switch in their existing Unity games to get a piece of the Marketplace before it becomes a dumping ground like those other app stores.

Keyboard

I picked up the Typing keyboard, not the membrane-style Touch keyboard. It’s not tiny, and it’s not full-sized, so the placement of the hands is off. But it’s really nice. It comes with a built-in trackpad because, yes, despite being a touch-centric device, you can use a mouse pointer. The underside of the keyboard is a non-slip felt. No logo, no leatherette material. It’s pretty weak as a fashionable cover, but it’s a keyboard. Cut it some slack! And it protects the screen when not in use.

Problems?

I need to use it more to say for certain, but these come to mind.

Battery! At full charge, the meter says about 3 hours. That was in “performance mode”. Turning off the wifi, setting the power saver mode to something more conservative, remembering to put it to sleep instead of letting it time out…those measures should help, but this is not a marathon-use device on battery.

Proprietary power! EVERYTHING in my house uses micro USB connectors, except for the 3DS and this. That means I have to buy more power cables to have them where I need them, and to avoid having to pack up the power everywhere I go.

Survivability! I’ve never really been a “screen protector” kind of guy, but I’m deathly afraid for this device, mainly because it’s nature demands that it move about a lot, and also because of it’s price.

Fairy Fingers! I actually had it easier on the desktop than with touch when it came to organizing the Modern UI. Deleting and moving tiles is an exercise in patience, as you have to move the tile just a little bit before you can unsnap or delete it. And I still ca’t figure out how to delete pages in OneNote without resorting to the trackpad. You need some very small and nimble fingers to do most of this, I assume.

Windows 8! Nah, not really. Just hater-baiting, because this is really where Windows 8 feels right. Sadly, due to the price and entrenched perception, normally open-minded folks who claim to hate Windows 8 will never get to see it in it’s native environment like this.

Here’s the “More On That Later” Section

I was at Best Buy, standing around waiting to catch the eye of a sales person (you’d have a better time finding Bigfoot with your eyes closed in pitch dark in the middle of a forest) and I was checking out other options. I saw the Galaxy…something tablet. It has a stylus as well, and was 1/2 the price of the Surface Pro. There were also laptops, again at a fraction of the price of the Surface Pro. I caught myself thinking “why not just get one of those and save money?”

The reason is because both of those options only did half of what I wanted. The tablet did tablet stuff, but not desktop stuff. The laptops had a physical keyboard attached at all times, which makes touch-screen use difficult. Both were portable, but neither did everything. That was my main criteria, and my reason for going with the Pro.

But wait! The Internet cries. A laptop is more powerful! A tablet doesn’t have that shitty Windows 8 Modern UI! Well, you’re both right. Had I wanted horsepower, I would have gone with a laptop, but I have a desktop already. I couldn’t take notes or draw on a laptop, and it wouldn’t be easy to stand up, walk around, and still use the thing on the go. If I had wanted a consumption device, I would have gone with a tablet. But I’ve owned an iPad and a Nexus. I have owned an iPhone, a few Android phones, and a few Windows phones. I have enough consumption devices in my life right now that I needed a productivity device instead. Trading the full power of each to have both in one package is what I expected, and what I wanted. So I don’t mind that it’s an “underpowered” laptop or a “Windows 8” tablet.

One thing I’ve noticed over the months since Windows 8 and Surface have been released, any criticism of Surface as a brand have been solely focused on RT, with none of the praise that Pro deserves. I can’t speak to RT, but whenever a blogger on a tech site wanted a punch-line, it was always Surface RT. It would have been really easy for those kinds of people to have their contacts get them a Pro so they could have something worth talking about, but…nothing. It was like a conscious effort to ignore the positive side of the product line.

Pro is a solid piece of hardware that makes a decent home for a solid piece of software. Yes, the price is daunting, putting it out of reach of many who consider price over form and function, which is sad on all counts. Reduce this in price by $300-$500 and I bet you’d be hard pressed to find one on shelves. You can get cheaper laptops; you can get cheaper tablets; you can’t get both in one package for cheap, though. That’s kind of sad, because I think the Pro is “the” device that actually promises a potential death of desktop computing at the hands of mobility, not because it dumbs it down or because it’s portable, but because it’ll do what desktops do, and it’s portable with far less compromise than you get from other devices.

Community

Being an MMO fan, nurse playing with others seems like it should be a no-brainer. Popular wisdom dictates that people play MMOs because they want to play withpeople, help right? Personally, I don’t subscribe to this: I play MMOs because they’re expansive, always available (except during patching windows), and updated frequently. I do like that there are other people in the world, though, because it makes the world more alive than it would be if it were just NPCs standing around, being helpless until you happen along to run their menial tasks for them. Thing is, I don’t like to play with random people.

I’ll jump ahead and say simply that I blame the game design mentality that puts loot and it’s inherent selfishness ahead of anything that requires people to actually work together for reasons beyond sheer brute force. I have no issues playing with people I know because I’m confident that we’re all nice people. If we want to take content slow, we’re all OK with that. If we don’t have the best gear, we’re also OK with that. We like the experience of the game, and aren’t in it for the loot or prestige.

One driving force that I’ve come to appreciate is honest-to-goodness community. This transcends in-game grouping, and isn’t even centered on MMOs. Finding a decent group of human beings who’s opinions you trust and who value the same things as you do when it comes to games is a much better motivator for me than any mechanical feature that a game offers. Sure, this is nothing new: tight-knit guilds or groups of friends have always been the tethers that keep people playing a particular game, or when severed, cause people to drift away.

The thing is, I’ve found I don’t even need that strong of an attraction: just a bunch of nice people being passionate about what they’re doing, so long as they’re all doing something in the same game. That’s important because a lot of people I interact with are gamers. Not all of us are playing the same games. It’s great to be able to talk about “gaming” with them, but if I’m not playing a game that someone else is, and vice versa, we can’t commiserate on anything specific. We can’t keep each other interested in the game itself like we can when we’re playing the same game, having similar experiences, discovering new things about the game, and even sometimes getting together in-game as well.

I realize now that after years of solo trekking across the MMO landscape, the reason why I’ve never been able to commit to a single game has been because of my lack of involvement in a really passionate community. I’ll take my share of the blame — I don’t find it easy to just drop myself into someone else’s life and feel comfortable — but I also wish there were more communities out there who organized along the same sentiments of “games as enjoyment” and not “games as ego-boosters”.

Zen And The Art Of Blogging

Blogging is a weird sport. Many people do it, store and many people wouldn’t be caught dead doing it. Of those who do, some treat it like a religion or a workout, while others only bother to post something when they remember that they have a blog. The reasons are varied, and the results are even more varied still. It’s very easy to set up a blog, but it’s very difficult to write something worthwhile.

But everything we write as bloggers is worthwhile! If it weren’t, we wouldn’t bother, right? So why is it that we can write a great post one week and get mediocre traffic, only to see someone else blog something remarkably similar the next week to great acclaim? It’s frustrating, but the old saw is “write for yourself”, and damn the reviews. We write not because we want to be famous, but because we really like to write, and that’s the most important thing.

Well, yes and no. Yes, we write because we love it. Writing will never go away, and thanks to the Internet, we no longer have to write in the vacuum of our own notebooks, which means that no, we don’t blog for ourselves entirely. If we didn’t care about getting feedback, we would just stick with our own notebooks. Despite what any blogger says, there’s some level of need to be read, and it’s very disappointing when that doesn’t happen.

In some ways, blogs are people’s attempts to connect with others. There are blogs about really personal things, about ephemeral things, about hobby things, but we all write about what we know and what we like, and we want to connect with people who know and like the same things. Blogs are our way of opening conversations with a much wider audience.

I sometimes wonder about people who don’t have blogs, or use social networks or anything like that: what do they do with their thoughts and ideas? Yeah, that’s a horrible “Internet Age” perspective, because people got on with their lives before the Internet and all. The short answer is that “they talk to real people”, meaning people around them: friends, family, co-workers. I wonder if my “online-ness” supersedes my ability or desire to deal with people.

Sourcebooks For Lore

On occasion, sildenafil I’ll pick up an RPG sourcebook for no reason other than to have it. Back in high school, pharm I had a lot of RPG books for games I never got to play, viagra approved like Mechwarrior or Paranoia, or Cyberpunk or Aliens. Although I had wanted to play them, my primary interest was in reading up on the settings and the mechanics that designers had added to the franchises that I loved.

I really hope they come out with a Defiance RPG. I think there’s a lot of potential background information in there that would be really interesting to have. I picked up the Battlestar Galactica sourcebook for the same reason, although I’ve tried to envision exactly how one could set a game in the confines of the Galactica and it’s fleet without it resulting in a lot of petty scenarios; I’d be interested to hear from anyone who might have played it. I think Defiance could offer a whole wealth of opportunities, however, since we’ve only heard about Defiance and San Francisco (and Las Vegas Prison). There’s still a whole lot of potential settings out there for players to create within the lore of the IP.

Defiance Season One

DefianceLogoThis week marked the end of the first season of Defiance on SyFy. Although SyFy ends up as the butt of a lot of jokes about low-budget movies like Sharktopus, hospital their original series are usually pretty good (EurekaBattlestar Galactica, Warehouse 13).

The Background

If you’re not a Defiance watcher, here’s the short setup: A bunch of aliens show up on Earth’s doorstep, having fled their own planets after their shared sun blew up. Attempts to co-exist were made, but eventually a huge war broke out between the humans and the Votans (the collective name for the refugee races) until one battle where both humans and Votans ended up defying orders to fight, and instead worked together to save civilians. This was called the “Battle of Defiance”, and is how the remains of St Louis (featured in the show) got it’s name.

At some point in all of this, the Votan ships — called arks in a very human-centric coincidence — were destroyed in orbit around Earth. The debris still encircles the planet, with occasional pieces crashing down in what’s called an arkfall. It was because of these arkfalls that alien flora mixed with native flora to re-terraform Earth, resulting in a planet populated by strange plants and animals.

The show focuses on the town of Defiance, which is played as 19th century frontier town, cut off from other civilization due to no railroads, no highways, and no air travel (apparently the arkfalls and terraforming have rendered anything over a mile high extremely radioactive and hazardous to flying machines).

More information about the show, it’s settings, and characters, can be found on one of the Defiance wikis.

The Show (With Spoilers)

I’ve seen a lot of people say that getting started with the show was rather difficult. One of the problems was that they didn’t actually explain who the aliens were, or why they were living in St. Louis. During the first few episodes, new races were sent out on stage, and we were introduced to them through their weird rituals. It felt like we were being force-fed someone’s world-building, but Defiance has the potential to be a large IP. The Votanis Collective is made up of several races, and while only a few are mentioned and shown (Castithan, Irathient, Indogene, Sensoth, Liberata, and Volge), there were hints of several others. There’s really just a lot of info to set up that was needed in order to power the rest of the season, and I think the first few episodes not only had to do this introduction quickly, but also be entertaining enough to get people to return next week.

Once the viewer becomes comfortable with the cast, their races, and their situations, the show was free to move ahead.

[SPOILERS – Highlight to read!]

There are two weekly plots ongoing throughout the season, and one overarching plot.

One of the two weekly plots involve Nolan and Irisa, a human arkhunter and his “adopted” Irathi daughter. Nolan was a solider who fought in the Pale Wars against the Votan, and is considered one of the “Defiant Few”, the soldiers who worked with the Votans at the Battle of Defiance. He rescued Irisa from what we’re initially lead to believe was an Irathiant cult (which included her parents), and the two have survived in the Badlands — the terraformed frontiers between towns — collecting valuable technological debris that rains down in arkfalls. The two end up in Defiance after a run-in with the Spirit Riders, an Irathiant band of thugs, steal all of their posessions. Despite their nomadic nature, Nolan helps Defiance repel an attack from the war-like Volge, and then accepts the job of Lawkeeper for the town. Irisa isn’t too happy about that. She dislikes being in constant proximity to other people, and the town bothers the hell out of her. 

The second plot involves the current acting-mayor, Amanda Rosewater, and her primary foil, Datak Tarr, a Castithan “businessman” (in the way Al Capone was a “businessman”). Tarr, who was born into a low-ranking liro (social caste) is looking to gain respect for himself and his family in Defiance, but his shadowy dealings usually put him at odds with Amanda, who wants Defiance to be a lawful, peaceful town where Votans and humans can live together. Mixed into this plot is Rafe McCawley, owner and operator of the town’s gulanite mine, and staunch supporter of Amanda and direct opponent of Tarr and his schemes. McCawley’s daughter Christie and Tarr’s son Alak are actually involved in a Romeo and Juliet level romance, and eventually marry near the end of the season (neither dies).

The overarching plot involves a mysterious piece of Votan technology that McCawley’s oldest son Luke finds in the mines, and for which he is killed by Ben, Amanda’s Indogene assistant. It’s revealed throughout the course of the season that Ben, the town’s Indogene Doctor Meh Yewll, and the former Mayor Nicolette Riordon (an Indogen altered to look like a human), are working together to find this technology, which they believe is buried beneath Defiance in the gulanite mines. The Earth Republic (E-Rep), a global defense force-slash-government is also searching for this technology, which they believe is a Votan weapon that had crashed into Earth and was buried. E-Rep is constantly attempting to cut a deal with Defiance to bring railway service to the town, but Amanda refuses to cut a deal with them, citing that other towns that have ended up suffering for the privilege.

The end of the season resulted in a Mayoral run-off between Amanda and Tarr, in which the E-Rep backed Tarr won by a narrow margin. As a result of a Tarr scheme to discredit Amanda by exposing Nolan’s xenophobic past, Nolan and Irisa plan to leave Defiance, except that Irisa is integral to the retrieval of the strange Votan technology that the Indogene and E-Rep are searching for. Through a fast-paced conclusion, Tarr and his wife Stahma are presumed to be under arrest for killing an E-Rep commander, Nolan is dead, Amanda’s sister Kenya (the madam of the NeedWant, a bar-slash-brothel) is presumed dead for threatening Stahma over their illicit relationship, and Irisa must face her destiny as the potential weapon that could end the world. The last scene of the last episode was of an E-Rep force marching on Defiance, blaring through their loudspeakers that the town was now under E-Rep’s martial law.

[END SPOILERS]

Whew! So, with that out of the way….

Is It Any Good? (With Minor Spoilers)

Really, like anything else, your mileage may vary, but overall I think it’s a good start to a potentially deep IP.

One of the things that I liked about the show is that Nolan wasn’t what you’d normally get out of a “lawkeeper”, but he wasn’t portrayed as a mercenary either. He seemed to be focused on taking Irisa to Antactica (which they believed was a paradise thanks to the terraforming), but wanted to also stay in Defiance where they “could make a difference”. But in one episode, when he and a former friend-turned-bounty hunter were arguing over who would retain custody of a wanted criminal, Nolan killed the criminal rather than allow the bounty-hunter to turn the captive (a scientist with a history of creating WMDs) over to E-Rep [Edited]. Despite it’s undercurrents, I also liked the recording that Datak had of Nolan’s testimony from his days as a soldier which painted him as an unhinged xenophobe. We’re constantly asked to accept this guy as a peacekeeper, but we’re also shown that he might not actually believe in peace, but that he’s also personally conflicted with that sentiment in Defiance.

When it comes to sci-fi, it’s a difficult line to walk. If you go too far, you end up with a show about technobabble, a la Star Trek. If you go too far in the opposite direction, the technology barely matters in the face of human drama, a la Battlestar Galactica. I think that Defiance straddled the line pretty well. First, it’s about the people. Second, it’s about the fact that some of those people are aliens. Third, it’s about the mixing of the two, and the re-formatting of a familiar Earth recreated into something different. There’s a lot of familiarity still around that we can use as touchstones: The McCawleys live in a house that, from the inside, looks exactly like there was never an alien invasion. The miners who work in the gulanite mine could very well be coal miners anywhere in the U.S. at this exact moment. There’s very little alien technology floating around. We frequently see the Castithan energy blade wielded by Datak, and in the pilot episode, the Volge appear as “laser-gun packing monsters”, complete with giant mechs.

One of the things that seems a bit too pretentious, however, is the town itself. Built on top of a buried St. Louis, Defiance is a mining town full of Votan and Human refugees. To that end, it seems that it’s trying very, very hard to prove that it’s a melting pot, with it’s ramshackle buildings that make it look like everyone is some kind of street vendor. Such a chaotic implementation assures the viewer that there a nearly infinite number of stories going on at any given time, but after a while, wouldn’t it make sense that people would be working to improve on the town by building buildings and things? The Indogene were smart enough to create the arks to carry the Votans to Earth, but people are consigned to living in corrugated metal shanties?

One of the things I can’t figure out: Who thought it was a good idea to let the Volge tag along on the arks? We learn that the Indogene were spearheading a covert investigation into humanity which involved altering volunteers to look human, and apparently also involved Nazi-level experiments on captured humans. I suppose the Volge were the Votan’s invasion force, should it turn out that humans didn’t care to have new roommates.

And then, of course, we still haven’t found out exactly what happened to the arks. Who destroyed them, and why?

The Future of The Future

Defiance has already been renewed for a second season, although the life-expectancy on SyFy is 4 seasons (Eureka, Warehouse 13, and Battlestar Galactica all lasted about 4 seasons), so if Defiance can make it to season three, it has a good shot of making it to four.

One thing I’m not going to go into here is the “transmedia” aspect. If you’re not aware, Defiance has an accompanying online shooter game available for the PC, Xbox, and PS3. It takes place in San Francisco, but there’s tie-ins with the show. In one example, an Irathi named Rynn left Defiance (the town in the show), and showed up as a character in the Bay Area (in the video game). Currently, Trion (developers of the game) are holding a contest where one lucky player will actually have his or her character given a back-story, and will appear in the TV show, as that character. Pretty interesting stuff. I may write up something about it from the game site over at Levelcapped.com

Considering I don’t watch too much TV, I’d be sad if Defiance was shut down prematurely. There’s an insane glut of “sci-fi-esque” shows on these days, but most are on network stations. Like I said above, it’s difficult to really pull off good sci-fi, and I don’t think the networks have the skills to pull it off. Defiance has an excellent pedigree in it’s creative staff, like Rockne S. O’Bannon (Farscape, Alien Nation), Michael Taylor (Battlestar Galactica, The Dead Zone), and Scott Stewart (Iron Man, Sin City, Superman Returns), which forms a pretty solid sci-fi wall right there.

[Thanks to @Xgeistatwork for setting me straight on the “Nolan killing the criminal” scene]