Off The Beaten Trail

I don’t know if I like the title of this post. It’s the first thing that popped into my head when I looked at this picture I took from my time in Wildstar last night.

The hookah-smoking splorg

I found this guy (and another “Alice in Wonderland” reference in the next room) because as an Explorer, abortion I was on top of a waterfall looking for the last element of a scavenger hunt. In that process, store I noticed some mushrooms outside of a tiny cave, page and when I activated the mushroom, I was shrunk to a size that allowed me to scoot into the cavern, where this guy apparently still thought it was 4/20.

This is where MMOs tend to really shine, with the inclusion of these “off the beaten trail” perks that you find only when you’re not so head-down and rushing to the end game. While relatively inconsequential to progress (I scored an achievement, and some housing items in the cave), someone on the design team thought that this would be a cool thing to include in the game…but only if someone happened to be at the right place to find it. Why would someone be at the right place, especially if they hadn’t started on the scavenger hunt? Normally I can’t see any other reason except for someone seeing the waterfall and it’s levels of plateaus and wondering if there was anything worthwhile up there. Which there was.

Unpopular Opinion – I Am Entertained

One of the worst parts about being part of this geek community is the self-gratifying nature of many of it’s members. I always point to the origins of “modern geekdom” being the days when people who liked comic books and science fiction and fantasy novels and movies were forcibly pushed from the mainstream, ailment and when the terms “nerd” and “geek” were actually derogatory, ampoule and not plastered on merchandise sold at one of the MegaFanCons found all over the world every month. You’d think that a group with roots like those would be more, healing I dunno…conscientious about not being dicks to other people, but another problem with this group is their lack of emotional and, yes, intellectual maturity.

Case in point: the unspoken “rules of engagement” whenever two or more geeks cross paths from opposite sides of the tracks. This nerdy West Side Story isn’t fought with guns or knives, but knowledge. The victor is always the one who lays down the most facts (not truths…facts), which is why the stereotype of D&D “rules lawyers” or of two geeks arguing over comic book minutiae is still prevalent today. It’s funny (supposedly) because it’s true…and because it’s absolutely meaningless outside of the context in which it’s being argued.

Last week was the highlight reel of this phenomenon. We had the release of the Star Wars: The Force Awakens ( I actually wrote “The Force Unleashed” for a second there), as well as the initial shaky-cam footage of the Batman vs Superman trailer. One caused orgasms; the other was the equivalent of waking up next to a  deformed goat, if the reaction of the Greater Internet is what you base your comparisons on.

I liked the Star Wars trailer. A lot. Several times. I also watched the “official” BvS trailer, and I liked that too. I am one of the handful of people who liked Man of Steel non-ironically. Yes. Read it as many times as you like; it’s not going to change before your eyes.

When the need to be “right”, or to be seen as being right supersedes one’s ability or decision to be entertained, I think we’ve lost. In fact, I think people have missed the primary irony in last week’s trailer dichotomy. People were all over the Star Wars trailer because it instantly brought them back to their childhood, when they didn’t have self-important Internet slap-fights to worry about, and when they only cared about enjoying the hell out of something. They then turned around and totally lost any and all ability to be entertained by something that should have been entirely within their wheelhouse. One on hand, we had the willingness and desire to be children again; on the other, cranky elderly people complaining about anything that came within five feet of them.

All the snark and the sarcasm and the hate is counter to the core of geekdom, really. We consider ourselves part of this community because of the things we like, and that puts us into contact with people who like the same things. Instead of coming together whenever possible, we opt to fight one another over who likes something more, or why the thing someone else likes is stupid. All arguments are supported with “who the fuck cares” tidbits of wisdom, the more obscure the better (because the more obscure the knowledge, the more of a super-fan (i.e. deserving) you’ve proven yourself to be!) until the argument ends not with an earned “win”, but because one side quits due to “stupid-fatigue”.

Why is it that this community feels that they have to be “right” over being “entertained”? What’s the prize to be won in taking your displeasure to the public? Seriously, I think that this attitude is really why we can’t have nice things, because even if we did have them, we certainly aren’t capable of appreciating them.

Adventure Co. Is Hiring!

Our D&D 5E group has encountered some perpetual bad luck concerning the fifth member of the party. Our cleric got tired of the adventuring life and set up shop at the tavern (not a tavern owner; he just refuses to leave). His replacement, a druid, approved got permanently stuck in animal form, no rx and was never heard from again (popular opinion was that he morphed into a rabbit, and is now in the possession of a little girl who refers to him as “Mr. Fluffybutt”).

That means that the Adventure Co. Brand Adventure Company has been down by an adventurer for a few weeks now, and is interested in getting back up to full strength.

Do you have what it takes to stick it out for two, maybe three, Thursday night (9PM – 11PM EDT) online D&D 5E sessions via Roll20.net? How about for longer than just a few sessions? We seem to go through fifth members like Spinal Tap goes through drummers, and we’d really like to find a proper fit to fill the empty position.

If interested, you can leave a comment here, or ping @Scopique, @Tipadaknife, @Girl_Grey, @Bluekae, or @grilledcheese28 on Twitter.

About Adventure Co. Brand Adventure Company

This is kind of a casual D&D group, if by “kind of” I mean “really, really”. We enjoy having fun with the process as much as we enjoy having fun playing the game, and that means that sometimes we can get a bit off track, or distracted by how much fun we’re having. We’re like our own laser pointers to our own spirit-cats. We’re not rules lawyers, preferring to put the enjoyment of the game ahead of coloring inside the lines as “The Man” taught us to do in kindergarten. Sometimes it feels like kindergarten, but that’s all part of the fun. We’re also don’t make hardcore demands: RP in first person, third person, lizard-person, potted plant, or watercolor painting, if that’s your thing. Or not at all!

Currently, we’re plowing through the Hoard of the Dragon Queen module, and all players are level 4. We currently have a monk, a ranger, a fighter, and a bard. There are no restrictions to what class you could bring to the party, although we’re only prep’d via the Player Handbook.

 

A River Cruise

It’s been a while since we’ve checked in on the Adventure Co. Brand Adventure Company, more about so let’s see what they’ve been up to, sale shall we?

/slowdisolve

Frume, story the Torm Paladin, has tasked the party with intercepting the dragon cult’s caravan ‘o riches before it leaves Baldur’s Gate. The quickest way to get to the city from Elturel is by river transport, and Frume has thoughtfully booked the party on a vessel that’s headed in that direction.

The Serpent’s Tail is a large, river-going “luxury entertainment yacht” which carries well-to-do citizens between Scornubel and Baldur’s Gate, and was the only passage available that would get the players down-river ahead of the cultists. Frume advised the party to get themselves some fancy duds, because the patrons of The Serpent’s Tail aren’t the kind to rub elbows with rough and tumble adventurers.

The boat/barge/testament to excess sported an open-air atrium (complete with four piece musical ensemble to greet the passengers as they embark), a lavishly appointed ballroom, a sumptuous dining room able to accommodate up to 60 guests, and a casino featuring the hottest gambling action this side of Luskan. The players, dolled up in their finest frippery, slipped on board with nary a sidelong glance that wasn’t judging their level of wealth and refinement. The bard, ever the performer, decided that she would take on the role of a Princess of Stripscrew Caverns, and pushed her way to the front of the gangplank to announce her presence to the halfling captain and her human first mate. She attempted to rope the monk into playing the role of her valet, but he constantly played the part of “I have no idea who this woman is” instead.

Once the cruise got underway, the party split up. The ranger kept himself out in the open, preferring the sky to the lavish canopies afforded by the yacht as he eavesdropped on passenger conversation for cultist plots. The monk took a nap. The bard visited the ballroom and warmed up with the orchestra who were preparing for the night’s festivities. The dwarf, however, ran into a bit of a situation at the casino (the dining room wasn’t yet serving lunch, so the casino was her second choice).

The casino was guarded by two bouncers who were asking all patrons “are you currently carrying any weapons?” as they entered the room. The dwarf was, of course, armed, having stashed her throwing axes in her beard. Unfortunately when it came time for her to answer the question, she couldn’t. Her throat seized up, and she was unable to assure the men that no, she was not armed. Realizing that the doorways were guarded by wards of truth, she had no choice but to return to her cabin, stow her weapons, and return once again.

At lunch time, the bard and the monk were first in line for a table. Eager to sample the delicacies that Frume’s passage had bought them, they plowed through the food in relative silence, only tossing their leftovers onto the floor three times as the horrified gentry looked on. Feeling a bit famished himself, the ranger came inside just in time for the main course.

The dwarf, having suffered through a curiously unlucky streak at the “D&D-equivalent-of-Craps” table, was feeling down on her luck and contemplating lunch when she glanced up and across the room. There was someone that she thought she recognized. It couldn’t be, could it? What would be the odds?

Stealthily, she wound her way through the crowd until she was absolutely sure: here was her longtime love, a dwarven prince, Ruret Ironstone, heir to the Ironstone Clan — a family that was engaged in a blood feud with her own. She couldn’t just walk up and introduce herself; his parents were also present, and the last time she had run across Ruret’s father, Delg Ironstone, he had threatened to throw her into a chasm, straight down to the Underdark. He had done it before to dwarves who had displeased him less than those who bear the name Battlehammer. She needed a plan.

Running to the dining room, she roped the monk into crafting a note: “Meet me on the aft deck tonight”, and then signed her name. She was adamant that Ruret know it was her, and not some random dwarven floozy who shaves her beard. The monk returned to the casino with the dwarf, where he not-so-suavely walked up and handed the note to Ruret.

Delg, surprised by the appearance of a gnome in what looked to be a formal bathrobe, snatched the note from his son’s hand and read it. Delg instantly comprehended the message, and his face grew red and twisted in rage. Both the dwarf and the monk beat a hasty retreat: the dwarf for fear of her life, the monk for fear of missing dessert.

*   *   *

The HotDQ module only mentions the river trip in passing, saying that it’s the quickest way down-river to Baldur’s Gate, but since it was presented as a throw-away scenario, I figured that this might be a better time to inject some custom content. Last time I had tried, the group was still getting used to getting back into the swing of tabletop gaming, and had pretty much torpedoed my side-adventure. This time, I figured we were all a bit wiser, more relaxed, and prepared for some relatively light-hearted content.

A simple boat ride down the river on a ferry (as the module suggests) could have been “ok”, but at some point I got it stuck in my mind that this should be a riverboat casino, like the stereotype of the steam paddle boats that plied the Mississippi River in the 1800’s. Putting the party amid a different class of character (socially and financially, not adventure-wise) might lend itself to some interesting hijinks as they attempt to fit in, but everyone seemed to take the concept naturally enough to fit in undetected.

I had a few “happenings” planned out that could be used during the three day trip. I had built the dwarf’s scenario from her chosen Background which stated that she was in love with someone whose family hated her family, and thought that this would be an interesting situation: trapped on a boat, the dwarf would be trying to hook up with her love while also trying to avoid the wrath of his family. Unfortunately for her, her compatriot was more interested in the dessert than in helping her out.

The Big Deal of this session was that it was all RP. There was no combat. The truth-wards on the doorways are there to ensure that everyone has a safe and pleasant trip. All of the rooms are fitted with Antimagic Field crystals which prevent the use of magic (especially in the casino). Since the next several sections of the module will require the party to do more talking than fighting, having a relatively low-consequence “RP re-education” session for all of us was probably a good idea.

I should have been doing this on previous posts, but after the session I thought I should include a footnote for the “joke of the night“, since we seem to have a new one every time we play. This week was the “single use monocle“, which can be used specifically to pop out incredulously, and then disposed off and replaced from a spare kept in one’s wallet.

Fantasy Grounds And Dungeons & Dragons

I’m sure folks are pretty sick of my going on about this, case but I realized I didn’t have a long form explanation as to why I’m so excited about the partnership between Wizards of the Coast and SmiteWorks.

WOTC5EPHBDELUXEI’ve owned Fantasy Grounds for many years, viagra sale and it was many years before I was actually able to use it. What sold me on FG over other virtual tabletop apps was that you could write your own modules within FG and benefit from having everything you need for the adventure right there in that app. All story elements, all notes, all NPCs and maps were just a drag and drop away. Being a vtable meant that a lot of the mechanics were handled by the application itself, which means that you don’t need to hunt for info about how much damage a sword does; you just press a button and the damage is taken care of.

While FG was good for home-brew modules, what it couldn’t WOTC5ELMOP2provide was a sanctioned core materials. This put the onus of translating something like “Keep on the Borderlands” entirely on you. You’d need to copy over each and every stat block by hand (or if you’re technically inclined, use one of the parsers that were written by hyper-intelligent FG users to scrap the D&D Insider website or PDF). Some companies, such as Paizo and Chaosium licensed products/names like Pathfinder or Call of Cthulhu which included core rules, tables, and other awesome stuff, but Wizards has always been conspicuously absent. WotC didn’t license 4E, which I suspect had a lot to do with whatever experience they had with 3.5, and a possibly bad experience with their early attempts to get into the digital space with 4E (PDF piracy, a failed virtual tabletop of their own, etc).

That’s why I’m so excited about seeing WotC jumping back into digital with D&D, and for choosing FG as their first partner*. It makes a lot of sense, since FG has dozens upon dozens of systems and adventure modules available through their store or through third party sites like Drive Thru RPG. FG is a complete system — tabletop, adventure modules, reference system, character manager, and game-play aide. The only think FG doesn’t do** is provide voice chat, so while it’s not a complete solution for bringing together disparate players, it at least brings everyone 4/5 of the way there.

 

* There was that initial partnership with a company that was making a tabletop companion app for tablets that suddenly went belly-up. The rumor that I heard was that those developers wanted to make the app a supplement to live games, while WotC wanted an entirely on-line tool that allowed people to play remotely. If that’s true, it’s a marked change from the 4E days when WotC tried to make their own vtable, failed, and allowed it to flounder in limbo until they announced that it was dead. In this case, it sounds like they wanted something, didn’t find it with their current partner, and opted to seek out one that was already aligned with what they wanted to accomplish.

** Fantasy Grounds is currently in the midst of a re-write. While I think the current application is 100% spiffy, it’s current incarnation more or less stretches back several years. FG developers have mentioned that they’re re-building the app from the ground up using Unity, so hopefully they’ll consider integrating at least voice chat, if not voice and video.