When Video Attacks

I just received a customer satisfaction survey via email for the company that sold me the second iPhone replacement screen that I bought from them. The survey was very short and straightforward, about it consisting of clicking stars for “how satisfied I was” and “would recommend to others”, page but at the end, they offered me the opportunity to leave some feedback in two forms. The first was a text box, and the second was a video testimonial. Their Flash widget would access my webcam (if I allowed it) and I could record myself hopefully showing the fine item I purchased, and gushing about how I loved the company that sold it to me.

Video is getting to be extremely annoying to me. I spend a lot of time on the Internet (it’s part of my job), and so a lot of that time is spent searching the Internet. Increasingly, I’m finding search results that lead to YouTube or other video service hosts. Technically, these results are 100% valid, but I’m finding that there are videos being recommended for the stupidest and most minor results imaginable. More often than not, my search could be answered in a single paragraph, so why should I have to sit through some amateur videographer stumbling through an explanation when a few words would have sufficed, and have been quicker and easier to index for the future?

Among my online circles, many people will use services like Twitch or Hitbox to stream video game play (AKA “Let’s Play”), but just as many in the same circles pop up like gophers to ask “why watch someone else play a game when you could play it yourself?” That’s a very valid question, and it’s one that is going to need a solid answer soon because game streaming is taking off at an exponential rate. A lot of games have it built in now, and both the Xbox One and PlayStation 4 have Twitch streaming included at the OS level.

Video has it’s place, but there’s a pretty large hump that a producer needs to get over before is should be considered as the first response in any situation. If all someone is going to do is stream exactly what they’re doing, the way they’re doing it, with no additional value added, then they might as well not do it at all. But far, far beyond that, people who can produce a slick video or stream, who can keep it interesting, and who can bring something more to the table than a paragraph or blog post could bring are going to be worth watching. In the case of watching gaming streams, I thought about it as the difference between watching the Super Bowl (exciting!), watching Little League baseball (notice how many parents are talking among themselves?), and getting your friends together to actually play a game of basketball (at my age, WAY more trouble than it’s worth). Good production values equals good view-ability, but only if you’re looking to put on a show. Doing it just because it’s a thing isn’t going to net any benefits, otherwise.