Zen And The Art Of Blogging

Blogging is a weird sport. Many people do it, and many people wouldn’t be caught dead doing it. Of those who do, some treat it like a religion or a workout, while others only bother to post something when they remember that they have a blog. The reasons are varied, and the results are even more varied still. It’s very easy to set up a blog, but it’s very difficult to write something worthwhile.

But everything we write as bloggers is worthwhile! If it weren’t, we wouldn’t bother, right? So why is it that we can write a great post one week and get mediocre traffic, only to see someone else blog something remarkably similar the next week to great acclaim? It’s frustrating, but the old saw is “write for yourself”, and damn the reviews. We write not because we want to be famous, but because we really like to write, and that’s the most important thing.

Well, yes and no. Yes, we write because we love it. Writing will never go away, and thanks to the Internet, we no longer have to write in the vacuum of our own notebooks, which means that no, we don’t blog for ourselves entirely. If we didn’t care about getting feedback, we would just stick with our own notebooks. Despite what any blogger says, there’s some level of need to be read, and it’s very disappointing when that doesn’t happen.

In some ways, blogs are people’s attempts to connect with others. There are blogs about really personal things, about ephemeral things, about hobby things, but we all write about what we know and what we like, and we want to connect with people who know and like the same things. Blogs are our way of opening conversations with a much wider audience.

I sometimes wonder about people who don’t have blogs, or use social networks or anything like that: what do they do with their thoughts and ideas? Yeah, that’s a horrible “Internet Age” perspective, because people got on with their lives before the Internet and all. The short answer is that “they talk to real people”, meaning people around them: friends, family, co-workers. I wonder if my “online-ness” supersedes my ability or desire to deal with people.